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Terracotta Ribbed Jar with Brown Glaze
North-Eastern Thailand
14th-15th century

diameter: 20cm, height: 18.3cm

This very attractive warm, dark brown glazed pot of spherical form is notable for its finely ribbed sides; the ribs extending to a low ring foot.

A short neck, decorated with two small ring handles, opens to a small mouth with a thickened rim.

The glaze stops at the lower body, close to the foot.

A frieze around the top of the vase is incised with repeated leaf motifs. Most likely these are betel leaves used in preparation of the betel quid, a mild social
narcotic which comprises a leaf, slices of betel nut and a smear of powdered lime paste. Indeed, it is surmised that such jars might have been used to store
lime, used in preparation of the betel quid.

The jar is from the kilns of north-eastern Thailand, most probably from those under Khmer control or certainly those showing Khmer influence. It dates to the
14th-15th century and possibly earlier. The form and glaze are suggestive of late Buri Ram influence.

The vase is remarkably free of damage or restoration. There is some glaze loss to part of the rim of the mouth but otherwise the glaze is intact.

References:
Brown, R.,
The Ceramics of South-East Asia: Their Dating and Identification, second edition, Art Media Resources 1988.
Brown, R.,
Southeast Asian Ceramics Museum, Bangkok University, Bangkok University Press, 2009.
Guy, J.,
Thai Ceramics: The James and Elaine Connell Collection, Asian Art Museum of San Francisco/Oxford University Press, 1993.
Miksic,. J., (ed.),
Southeast Asian Ceramics: New Light on Old Pottery, Southeast Asian Ceramics Society/NUS Museum, 2009.
Rooney, D.,
Khmer Ceramics: Beauty and Meaning, River Books, 2010.

Provenance: private collection, UK

Inventory no.: 4693

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